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to do -- people at headquarters, they show up at election night, unless the guy or woman loses and they get excited about the guy near election night because they want a job. they want something. they want to be loved by the winner. then they treat the guy like a ticket at off-track betting on the floor you're stomping around on. so what happened here? is that the best case against the case being made against the republican party? it's a bunch of people just not loyal? that's what he's saying. >> absolutely, chris. look, i've been through this time and time again, that people are measuring the drapes before the first debate ends, especially if the nominee does a very good job. >> now they're measuring the crepe. >> true. mitt romney unfortunately never had any -- a loyal following, if you will, except for the folks in boston. the conservatives never trusted him. they didn't even trust him when he got the republican nomination back in the spring of this year. the point is these individuals are opportunists, both on the republican side and also on the democratic side. they don't
before the midterm elections. robert kennedy is meeting in his office and they are trying to work out deals privately about this. word has just come to kennedy that an american surveillance plan has been shot down. and kennedy has a tape recorder rolling and talks to buddy kennedy. and kennedy thinking, okay, we think the plane has been shot down. now what do we do? and he's going through, he is thinking about the political pressures and it is such a remarkable moment that you get to hear in real time, struggling through, what do we do? do we retaliate? we sent our planes over? as it happened, he was handed a reprieve. it was a false alarm. but you get the sense of what kennedy is still facing. this is a week after the 13 days >> host: kennedy was acutely useful of escalation and how they would lose control of the situation, except now with nuclear weapons. so the contingency plan had been to shoot down them and kennedy refused to authorize it because he was so afraid of it. it wasn't just a question of what kind of plane,. there were some planes that were safer and less horrible to b
. he will also talk about the 2012 election and recent meetings at the white house between congressional leaders and president obama. this is an hour and 20 minutes. >> we are delighted to have grover norquist with us. of course, he is president of americans for tax reform but in the spirit of full disclosure, he is also a member of our board of directors and a very important colleague. grover spoke here several months ago, i should say here at the center, but not in this room because we moved -- there may be some glitches, so i apologize in advance. i am sure we will do better next time. however, grover talked about taxes, u.s. economic policy. but that was about taxes and the electoral campaign. now we had elections and the taxes are at the center of a very important political debate and at the center of negotiations between the obama administration and congress, particularly the republican controlled house. as i watched the president during his recent press conference and listened to leaders of the house, i think everybody agrees it would be highly desirable to reach a c
election. robert kennedy is meeting in his office with the soviet ambassador. they are frying to work out the deals. privately about this. word has come to kennedy in the oval office that an american plane, the pentagon told him that the american surveillance plane may have been shot down over cuba. kennedy has the tape recorder rolling and talking to robbie kennedy while the prime minister is -- ambassador is the room. we think a plane has been shut down. what do we do? and he's going through do we do air strikes? he's talking about the things about the prelim performs going to be faced when it comes out. it's one of the remarkable moments you get to hear a.in real time struggling through, okay, now what go do? do we retaliate and send our planes over and knock out the airfield which would have reinflamed the crisis. kennedy was having a reprieve. it was a false alarm. they had scrammed. they hadn't shut down an american plane. you goat windows and you get a sense of the tension what kennedy is facing. had is, you know, a week after the 30 the days. you get a sense how close military act
. that is what they are elected for. i just do not think the states would benefit from having grand elections, more spending, more commercials and when the money needs to go directly to the people. we also need to be wary of cutting spending on the platform, cuts in programs of obama's platform. host: do you think the states should use their line of communication of congress or the white house? caller: i think we need to trust the congress and believe that we have elected them to do the state's business and trust them to do it. host: let's go to mike. caller: i think the states already have several budgets to their elected officials. if the governor wants to have a say on the budget, get a hold of their elected officials, their congressman, bring them to the governor's office and laid the lot down to them on what the what the congressman to go back and portray in washington. host: let's hear what marie has to say on the independent line. caller: i think only the blue states should have a say because the blue states contribute overwhelmingly more money to the federal government. the red states
before when the early voting numbers look good for us. >> you thought it long before the election. i know that. [laughter] >> but i was pretty sure -- >> how long? could he have one after the first debate or where the forces in motion? >> sure, absolutely he could have one. -- won. it was competitive the entire way. i think governor romney could have one up until the end. i always believe in the fundamental truth, we were building the best grass roots campaign in modern political history. we had the best candidate and the best message. >> in a way, the story of this election is the degree to which replicated the 2008 results. many people thought that 2008 was a once-in-a-lifetime result. you came very close to replicating it. i think the most fascinating statistic is african-americans in ohio, 11% of the electorate, 15% this time. you found 200,000 more african- american voters who turned out for you. mitt romney lost the state by 103,000. that was the election, right there. finding those extra african american voters. >> let me back up. we won this election because of barack obama. peopl
own hanley work. will it's hope in the post election atmosphere this dynamic can change and mccain can proudly support his very own bill. let me close by saying i do think america is exceptional. it is the global melding pot, a place where the universal nation is being created. we may not do better in immigration than anyone before but we do assimilation better than anyone. people from all over the world come to this country and almost magically become real americans but part of being a real american is urging the country to look at its flaws and change them. let's get started. >>> as president obama readies for a second term, i wondered who could best shed light on the challenges he faces and how to deal with them. the president is an avid student of american history so i thought it was fitting to ask two great pulitzer prize-winning historians to sit down with me. robert carroll has written four biographies and jon meacham has a new book out on a twice elected president. the book is called "thomas jefferson: the art of power." listen in on my conversation with them. gentlemen, thank
. actually, during the summer of 1992, as the political season was heating up before the election, nixon and i had both heard some strange clicking sounds on his telephone. and he said, "you know, the phone may be tapped." and i said, "well, it certainly could be." and he said, "well, let's try a little experiment." he said, "i'm going to call you." and he was on his way to california. so he said, "i'm going to call you from california at your home, and i'm going to tell you that i'm going to come out endorsing ross perot for the presidency." c-span: and he thought that the bush administration was afraid of this? >> guest: yes. yes. actually, both sides might think, "well, what was going on with richard nixon if he's endorsing ross perot?" so he said, "i'm going to tell you that i'm endorsing ross perot. i want you to keep a straight face and a straight voice. don't let on to anything." and he said, "we're going to set this person up if, in fact, there are wiretaps on my phone." so he flew to california, he called me, we went through this little episode, and then nothing ever came of it.
. >> bill: allall right. now, when i pointed that out on election night that people were breaking for the president and a large part of the reason was entitlements, 'cause the below 30,000, 63% vote for barak obama, gave him 7 million in plurality and he won by 3 1/2 million popular votes. when i pointed that out. the "washington post" editorial board attacked me. my question to you as a psychiatrist now, the facts are on my side. i proved the case beyond a reasonable doubt using the facts. the exit polling, and all of the facts that we presented last night and tonight. why are they attacking me so vehemently? what is wrong with telling the american people what's going on? >> well, look, the fact is democrats did get their demographic, but that doesn't prove that they got the demographic because they're getting more stuff. i think traditionally democrats have been getting their demographic for a very long time. that skew in social class is to who gets the vote, democrat or republican, has been around for a long time. i think it's a plausible theory. i don't think it's a proven fac
of the issues about regulation and so now that we have the election over, we have to focus on passing the sites. we take that step and we focus on them creating these new industries, i am confident we will remain the most logical relationship. other nations was are racing or were and there is a reason to be concerned. i look at it may be optimistically by saying the losses have fall. >> michael has been an optimist and he's saying we have a chance here. can i invite some pessimism >> i am fundamentally optimistic. [laughter] >> unbelievable. a budget guy. if you think about the structure of the budget which reflects the value of evidence in the political system, we have huge programs which are basically legacy programs serving all americans and those programs are crushing the discretionary accounts, where we fund national-security, education, the core investments. this allows the path to crush of the future. it is against what they talked about. we have to agree that innovation will solve health care, educational, energy. look at what fracking has done. we're not doing any of the is thing is. >
't elections, hard for some to understand and we have to respect individual institutions and the decision they make but it doesn't mean we should hold back and say what we think. i think it is clear inhe time is right for women bishops. they need to get on with it and ge with the program but you do have to respect the individual institutions when they're getting a shark fraud. >> the big country, e.u. agreed to by the last labor government, time for it costing taxpayers two billion pounds every single year. will the prime minister please confirm the forthcoming budget negotiations, he will not agree to any further reduction in this debate? >> i certainly give my hon. friend that assurance. the rebate negotiated by margaret thatcher is an incredibly important part of britain's position of making sure we ge a fair deal. .. >> can i congratulate the prime minister on his wise decision? can i confirm the enthusiasm of which it was received? can i ask him if he believes it will be possible to bring further prestigious events to northern ireland in the future? the right decision, for the g8 to
in the election of 1964. johnson listens to this, and he says very somberly, dick, if that is the price for the spell, i will gladly pay it. a remarkable story of hers. if i may just help one more quick story about his loyalty. as harry knows, he was fiercely loyal to those who worked with him. when the staff was leaving the white house in 1959 and they were going back and finding jobs, lbj wanted to make sure that everybody landed in a good job. transitioning with good prospects. there was one guy who worked as a legal counsel for lbj. he signed out of the white house in order to go to los angeles to talk about starting a washington office for this prosperous firm. the new that he had signed out in order to take this interview. going to los angeles, he meets with the partners of this law firm in a conference room and they are all hundred together. they are very frustrated and one partner says, okay, you take a call from the president. they all leave and pearson gets on the phone. and he says, i don't know if you noticed, but i signed out of the white house and i'm in los angeles. lbj s
to run for re-election next year. storm victims have been asking about his plans. >> this weekend, mary pat and i, the kids, had an opportunity to just kind of have a few minutes to ourselves. and we talked about it. and we've decided we're going to seek re-election. and we're wanting to get that going today. so i instructed my campaign treasurer to file papers with the election law enforcement commission to seek re-election. and so -- >> there you have it. christie has been extremely hands on in dealing with the storm damage. that has helped fuel a huge spike in his approval ratings which now hover around 80%. >>> in dewitt county, illinois, reluctantly agreed to a coin flip 14 days after their election ended in a tie. incumbent ferguson called tails. decisive coin flip was more like gambling than democracy, he says. >>> crane on fire starts to collapse with hundreds of people standing below in australia. now we're learning about a connection between that crane and another crane that buckled in new york after superstorm sandy. [ female announcer ] imagine skin so healthy, it never gets
was a huge year. you had johnson resigning, decided not to go for another term. yet nixon's election, assassination of mr. king and bobby kennedy. you had democratic party's wild convention in chicago. so a lot of books on 68, woodstock and also months and that sort of thing. so i'm afraid my book is by no means unique. there's also a book on 1964, which makes pretty much the same argument as i do, only he sets a year earlier. i don't have been a huge quarrel with that. i wouldn't say i'm the only person who's right about this, the 65 did seem to be the time, not that it was the most romantic. 68 probably was in terms of world shattering, memorable events. but it was a time when the 50s and early 60s rapidly vanished or began to vanish from view and a hurry. the real reason, that's why. >> i think i've pretty much agree with you that the central year is 1965. but there's something more at stake in your book, at least i think so. i want to prove i'm not. in a way we can either be talking about the 60s and just talking about were 65 hits in the 1960s, but there's a claim in the book on
about barack obama running for the presidency in 2008 if he had lost the illinois senate election, not if he had won it. that's the level of national security we're talking about here. >> harvard business school professor profiles historic and
♪ in the senate election he'll do more for you and me ♪ look at kennedy's history ♪ you'll see it's no mystery ♪ he's your kind of man so do all that you can ♪ and vote for kennedy ♪ >> we added the pictures and photographs ourselves. but that's a part of the c.d.'s that you get with the book. >> it is. >> how come that's in that? >> well, it's audio and it's great. it's evocative of a time really before tv. kennedy came out of politics before television was as important as it became, and then he rode the importance of tv very effectively. but that's from an earlier time, 1952. tv existed, but not many americans had it. music was really important to politics, both on radio and then even at events, where people would sing. and so like any politician, he need add theme song, and in 1952 he was running for senate for the first time and had a very well-organized campaign and had to have a song. i guess the short answer to your question is i listen to a lot of audio. the tapes themselves coming out of the white house. but then there were a lost audiotapes of kennedy speaking into a dictaphone
in supporting the pending measure. speaker thomas p. o'neill, other wise known as tip, was first elected to represent the 11th congressional district of massachusetts in 1952 and he continued to serve for 17 terms. during his 34 years in congress, he served as the chair of the select committee on campaign expenditures, majority whip, majority leader, and finally speaker of the house. speaker o'neill holds a special place in my own congressional career because when i was sworn in at the beginning of my first term in congress in 1977, it was also tip's first year as speaker of this body. he held that post for a decade, making him the second longest tenured speaker in the history of the high pressure system. there are a litany of legislative accomplishments that could be described as defining the career of thomas p. o'neill, however his most remarkable guide post was his dedication to federal programs that addressed the needs of the poor, the middle class, the sick, the fallen, and our working men and women across this great country. speaker o'neill is an unabashed supporter of the new deal
this many times, presidential elections are referendums on the incumbent party and in that vein such as the case as i believe it is, then you have to say that it's a judge to by the electorate was not a tremendous perhaps lackluster but not so as to make him ineligible for rehiring. second, when the country is in a serious political deadlock of the kind that we are in now and it's happened in our history but it doesn't happen often it generally means that the deadlock is focused on a definition question of america, and the definition question faced in this country is that we are going to go towards a european style of social democracy or more towards the traditional conservative populism of jackson or ronald reagan. third, when the country manages to deal with such a deadlock or change such a deadlock as this it doesn't come to any other means. so you have a lot of red and that may be a good harbinger for your party but it doesn't say anything about how the country is going to move forward in terms of what you promote. so given all of that if you buy any of it, to what extent do
the west had been a little bit concerned about how egypt's recently elected islamist government would handle a situation like this. they did seem to strike a balance between appeasing their muslim brotherhood supporters who wanted them to talk tough with israel while making sure there's no chance of jeopardy jeopardizing that 32-year-old peace treaty with israel and, of course, the $1.5 billion in u.s. annual aid that comes attached to that treaty. >> clarissa ward thank you. >>> we now go to margaret brennan in washington where she is learning more about the united states' role in the cease fire deal. >> good morning to you charlie, and to gayle. u.s. and israeli officials say u.s. president obama sealed the deal with benjamin netanyahu but hillary clinton delivered the cease fire by showing up the primary contact between the administration and netanyahu. over a decade they speak frequently. clinton was the first administration official to meet egypt's president, mohamed morsi, after his historic election. and now by elevating him to peace broker the u.s. is
. they are blaming obamacare on this, but this was before the election the price of health care was going up. across the board, we are not dealing with problems at hand. both sides of the aisle, those that don't want to give an answer to this before we go over the fiscal cliff, they're not responding to the will of the people. they will be voted out. there's no doubt. if we have some very lovely and caring republicans that are very conservative and we love them, but we will vote them out if they don't fix this. we are holding them responsible as we are holding the democrats. host: thanks for the call. we will continue discussing the fiscal cliff and taking your calls. we want to point out some other news going on in the world. here's the front page of the boston globe this morning -- clinton was dispatched by president obama to israel and is meeting today with egyptian officials and palestinian officials as well. the headline from the tribune -- late tuesday night clinton met with benjamin netanyahu in jerusalem and plans to go to the west bank on wednesday. clinton is preparing to step down early n
that we elect our better than that. there are always going to be some people who let you down, but we all -- now to tell you how important we are, my daughter lucinda told me about a conversation that -- she met a mother of wonderful children and the person said, well, tell me, what are you doing here? lucinda said, well, my mother is speaking. she and susan for are going to be speaking tomorrow. oh, oh? well, they're going to be speaking about life in at the white house. hmm-mmm. lucinda then proceeded to say, oh, my grandfather was president lyndon johnson. and the person said, well, what did he do? [laughter] now, what does it teaches you is that susan and i are not as famous as we think we are. [laughter] >> susan, your father's legacy, people forget about how close he was to being elected in his own right and vindicated on and so many friends. but what are the specifics that you think history has not yet given him enough credit for, ways in which his influence is echoed? it might be things like helsinki. it might be legislation. it might be examples. >> talk about your mother. [laugh
meetings after the election of 1960, i think they had each come away quite impressed by the other, that kennedy had been describing eisenhower as kind of slow and doddering and not alert to the new realities of the 1960's. he met an extremely forceful and intelligent president of the united states in dwight eisenhower. i think likewise eisenhower was dismissive of a wealthy politician, a much younger man, a senator whom he had not condescended to meet as president. and he also came away as someone who was extremely well versed. so they began to like each other more. and especially during this crisis i think they had a sense of how lonely it is to occupy that office and how you're getting all kinds of advice, you're getting good advice, you're getting a lot of faulty advice, which kennedy was, including from his joint chiefs. eisenhower knew all about faulty military advice, and he was able to speak with his supreme authority about the dangers as well as the advantages of military advice. so he was a very useful ally to president kennedy. >> were you alive during the cuban missile
% unemployment rate down. the place to double down and focus is innovation and entrepreneurship. now the election is over. this is recognition this is important. there are many issues being debated. they are all important issues. the most important thing is making sure we build on this. >> i do not mean to pick on the president. i liked the idea that you start on things where there is a lot of agreement, but looking at trade and who will help. -- looking at trade will help. they do not even know each other, and they have no idea what the common ground is. >> i guess the concern is how apple does not make any thing in america. what does that tell us? we have made the cost and complexity of doing business in this country prohibitive, and we have not risen our skill base enough to have employees that can earn about high wage -- earn the high wage. i think so entrepreneurship is part of the solution and it has been bipartisan to support small business. we have to support of all business. i come back to a lot of this is blocking and tackling. it is being strategic. our alumni are all over the world, a
. and then a look at marriage equality and voters approval of the initiatives on the balance this election year -- ballots this year. >> with soldiers on guard outside the customs house and outside the homes of crown officials and with british artillery now aimed at the house, it is easy to understand why many bostonian felt threatened. soldiers tried to stir up racial tension. of course, not everyone in boston is white. within a month of their arrival, three british officers are discovered encouraging african american slaves in boston to attack their white masters. one of those drunken officers assured the black bostonians that the soldiers had come to procure their freedom. with their help, they should be able to drive the liberty boys to the devil. the british army is not in boston to free the slaves. several white residents lodge complaints. captain wilson and his friends had engaged in a dangerous act to foment slave dissatisfaction. >> a discussion on how veterans are treated when returning from war. we will hear from: paul and general stanley mcchrystal, former commander of troops in --
substantive proposal by an elected official that actually achieves the target of $4 trillion in deficit reductions in a balanced way. >> is there a consensus around that? is there consensus among all parties that $4 trillion is the goal docks "that is the president's goal talking about the longer-term issues -- is that the goal? >> that is the president will talking about the fiscal cliff challenges. he has described that going backed to the spring and summer 2011 as a big deal. it would help put us on a sustainable path that helped create the kind of ratio of deficit to gdp that alan krueger and others have been an discussing. that is his goal. when we talk about the longer- term deficit reduction targets, the near term target, one that could be resolved tomorrow if the house so desired, would be to pass the extension of the middle class tax cuts which would remove a substantial portion of the fiscal cliff right away and would give certainty to consumers and retailers right away. the president, as he has repeatedly, urges the house to do that. we should not hold the middle class hostag
excitement over obama's victory. ahmadinejad accused the election as capitalists. obama wasted no time in showing his continued interest in the region. white house officials announced on thursday the president is expected to attend the east asia summit next week in cambodia. >>> presidential candidates are stepping up their campaigns. the front runner is taking a tough stance on foreign policy and the opposition camps announced a surprise move. park said historical and territorial issues are causing diplomatic conflicts in east asia. she said she'd also be open to dialogue. park said south korea will not tolerate provocations by north korea. that includes nuclear and missile development. they want to open offices in each other's capitals. she said she'd seek to hold talks with north korean leader kim jong-un. she said the senkaku islands are not open to negotiation. japan claims the islands, south korea controls them and calls them tokdo. park showed a willingness to negotiate on the deal. the negotiations have been suspended since 2004. opinion polls show park is leading by more than
at that amount of money that was spent on all the election campaigns, all of them, $6 billion. now, i was shocked by that. i moderated a discussion the other morning between karl rove and james car vill and rove's reaction -- >> how lucky can one guy be? [laughter] >> it was actually -- it was fascinating. but mr. rove made the point that we spend infinitely more than that on dog food. >> that's absurd. >> yes, it is, it is. because, as much as i have always loved our pets and loved pets in general, the fact of the matter is, if our elections end up being reduced to the snarling and shouting and innuendo, you know, people keep saying, things were worse in jefferson's time. yes, they were. but you only had broad sheets that were being distributed. you didn't have everyone walking around with his or her own little communications device. information now is spread so ubiquitously, is spread so quickly, so instantaneously, that if we don't have reliable, trustworthy, objective sources of information, then our whole electoral structure is going to collapse of its own weight. >> you know, ted, there was
to get elected. so that is first, the second one of the first one on gainful employment we talked about trying to, the importance of driving incentives. this was an attempt to say, okay, what are the outcomes that we're really shooting for in the post-secondary space? there are a lot of things that are important around learning and social capital but in particular in this time, in our country, people's ability to get out, get jobs to pay them enough money to pay back their loans, at a minimum threshold seem like a pretty good indicator whether or not post-secondary institution provided them with good service. people reacted to this. reacted to it for a number of different reasons i think. one, i think that was, fair is that for-profits, because of where we were, without reauthorization of things like that, for-profits and career oriented programs including in non-profits were targeted first for the gainful employment regulation. they felt like we're going to operate under different rules than some of the others. that i kind of understand but a general pushback on hey, we're trying to mo
think president obama was elected to make the hard costs. host: what you mean? caller: he was elected to make a choice for the country. the majority of the country. the republicans are wrong and he is right. and i think that he should let us what the fiscal cliff because the republicans are scrambling out trying to change everything. they need to mow them out. and change it then. but i think they should let them go off the cliff. host: are you on medicare and social security? having yes. cliff wranglers way medicare age. can the country afford to continue on this road? paying what we pay for medicare? caller: we can afford it but it is a necessary evil. we have got to of the people stand firm and put the country back on a track that everyone can understand it. there will not be any blind stops. because this is what we have got to do and we should do it. and i think that president obama should let it happen. host: raise taxes on everyone or those who make more than $250,000 a year? caller: on everyone. it is fair. we lived through a bush. i think we can live through this. host: ok. tha
for the presidency in 2008 if he had lost the senate election, not if he had won it. that is the level of national of security we are talking about. >> the professor profiles historic and modern leaders to show the lessons that can be learned from those who have had the greatest impact on their time. he talks on book tv, sunday at 9:00 p.m. and midnight eastern, part of a book tv's holiday >> actor and former california governor arnold schwarzenegger joins a group of executives for a discussion on hollywood impact on culture. this marked the launch of the university of southern california's new schwarzenegger institute. the discussion was moderated by ben smith. from los angeles, this is about an hour and 15 minutes. [applause] >> thank you for turning up for this. it is an honor to be here. anyone who has been uncovering policy in new york kind of feels entertainment industry has this enormous power in politics and public policy, and also as a dark matter out there. we do not fully understand how it is affecting and changing what happens on the east coast. we have a remarkable panel of longtime l
capture him. >>> the recommend-elect of mexico will take office this saturday. he says he want -- the president-elect of mexico will take office this saturday and he wants to discuss the drug war when he talks with president obama. immigration will also probably be among those discussions. >>> 7:15. new this morning, u.n. ambassador susan rice is meeting with -- on capitol hill with three senators who have been critical of her initial explanation about the attacks in libya. jamie dupree has more from washington, d.c. via skype. >> reporter: there is a lot of talk that she will be nominated for the position of secretary of state. rice is here this morning meeting with senators john mcan, lindsey graham and others in the basement of the capitol. you can see a stakeout that's down there where vee with -- where we have microphones set up. we're hoping to hear from some senators later this morning about this meeting. rice has taken a lot of flack for her explanation on the talk shows about what happened on the attacks in libya on that u.s. facility in benghazi where four republicans
ronald reagan was elected in november 1966, j. edgar hoover and other fbi officials do this as a breath of fresh it. they believe they finally had an out in the governor's mansion, and begin to work closely with ronald reagan to crackdown on student protesters and radical professors. >> so what happened? >> well, what the documents show that over the following years, well, what happened first is that one of the first things reagan does after he is elected is to phone the fbi request this briefing, which hoover personally authorizes. two wks later at fst board of regents meeting, attended by ronald reagan, the board of regents votes to fire clark kerr. the boards balance in power had shifted because reagan was nine-member and he made several appointments to it. one of the fbi documents that was released indicates that the board members were aware of certain fbi information that ronald reagan had at the time. and in the following months and years, the documents show that the fbi continue to cooperate with reagan and to secretly provide him reports on certain professors and students, with
coalitions of communities of color. sometimes, when i would walk into some rooms, when running for elections, he was sometimes the only friendly face. and i still remember -- and i really, really, really miss howard. i'm really sad. it's truly a loss for our city. but i'm so grateful that i had an opportunity to work with him and to get to know him. >> the clerk: thank you, supervisor kim. supervisor mar. >> supervisor mar: i wanted to add on to the restroomance remes well. he always was reaching out to build solidarity, not just with the labor movement but with the antiwar movement and the lgbt communities as well. he was an incredible person. i wanted to thank his former seiu local 250 ac activist colleagues kathy lip scom for watching out for him so long but other activists like tab, eileen, his susan, carl, and the whole pride at work community for really making sure he was cared for in his last days as well. i wanted to say that i had tremendous respect for him as an organizer but especially as a person with a long view of movement building. and i wanted÷apx? to ask if i cd also be add
think our people that we elect our better than that. there are always going to be some people who let you down, but we all -- now to tell you how important we are, my daughter lucinda told me about a conversation that -- she met a mother of wonderful children and the person said, well, tell me, what are you doing here? louis -- lucinda said, well, my mother is speaking. she and season for are going to be speaking tomorrow. oh, oh? well, they're going to be speaking about life in at the white house. hmm-mmm. listen then proceeded to say, oh, my grandfather was president lyndon johnson. and the person said, well, what did he do? [laughter] now, what does it teaches you is that susan and i are not as famous as we think we are. [laughter] >> susan, your father's legacy, people forget about how close he was to being elected in his own right and vindicated on and so many friends. but what are the specifics that you think history has not yet given him enough credit for, ways in which his influence is echoed? in might be things like helsinki. in my be legislation. it might be examples. >> tal
, when i would walk into some rooms, when running for elections, he was sometimes the only friendly face. and i still remember -- and i really,
differences with the last couple of years lost his re-election bid. i'm not going to say that i'm sorry for a minute but i will say this, congressman west. it will give you this. you speak your mind for what you think is right. it's often wrong but you think that about me so i wish you luck in the future, whatever you do. you were an army hero. other things. so anything i did to offend you i want to take it back and say have a happy thanksgiving and good life. >> eric: you're scared because when he comes here he will kick your butt. >> bob: just like i'm scared of you doing it. okay. >> dana: i had to chance to talk to colonel west and he said give everyone regards and in particular pointed out bob beckel. this is great story for holidays and took place in my hometown of parker, colorado, write went to high school. retired army corporal nick orchowsky injured in iraq and was paralyzed and is able to slowly walk again. a service called home for our troops. they raised $200,000 and made a specialty built home for him. he has a wife and two kids and i thought that was a great way. look at
right. that's good to hear. all right, now, iran again influencing presidential election because of the nuke thing. >> well, i'm worried about it in the sense that everybody is. obviously a trouble spot. same regime that is in my movie in 197 with khameneiy. islamist regime. we are still dealing with them. if they got a bomb, i think everybody thinks that would be trouble. i'm just an amateur pundit. but my feeling about it is one has to be judicious. i don't think there is a lot of daylight between. >> what does judicious mean. here is the choice strangle them with sanctions which seems to be working right now because their currency is collapsing right now. >> they are in bad trouble. >> bill: give go in reaches a certain point and whack them. >> my understanding is netanyahu or israel is not entirely capable of whacking them to the extent they need to be whacked. i wouldn't trust u.s. foreign policy to any other government. i would be judicious in the sense that hyper sen tages of americans don't want to see another war. be quite careful. however we have to have a line beyond w
obama was elected was a call to not only in the war in iraq, which he did, but also as he put it, he claims he would and the mindset that leads to war. unfortunately quite the opposite has happened. we have had an expansion of wars particularly through the drawn wars and one of the things that is so ironic about that is that along with all of the deaths of civilians and frankly people who are on those lists for reasons that we don't always know when we don't know who put them on the list, where it is that intelligence come from and how reliable is that? it's usually problematic on a host of levels but particularly the level of civilians who are killed for no reason these drone strikes and how that antagonizes people across these countries. that is exactly the opposite of the idea of looking for new ways to solve the conflict, ways of looking at ways to avoid the mindset. this is exactly reflecting the mindset of war. so this in my view is the biggest violation if you will of the promises that president obama made from the time he was elected four years ago. >> host: let's go to marcy
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